9 Steps To Be Manufacturer Ready

9 Steps To Be Manufacturer Ready

Posted by on Apr 24, 2019 in Emerging Designers, Established Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Industry Know How, Manufacturer | 0 comments

Here at Sample Room, we have a number of meticulous steps in place to ensure the highest quality patterns and samples, ultimately providing you with the best chance to create the perfect garment with your manufacturer.Read on to see the 9 steps we take to ensure you are manufacturer ready and on your way to creating an amazing collection!1. Design the style When we are creating patterns for our clients there are a variety of ways they communicate their design ideas. Some might come to us with sketches that have been developed by a graphic designer, others with physical examples. Communicating your design ideas can be challenging. In our Fashion Label Launchpad course this is where we start guiding new designers through the process. From here, we flesh out the design as the building block to make the pattern from.2. A pattern is made Our expert pattern makers use a digital system called CAD. Using a system like this allows us to make patterns quickly and efficiently. Where altering and adjusting of patterns is needed, working from a digital software allows us to make edits much quicker than if the pattern was on card. This ultimately reduces time and money for all our clients.3. A toile is sewn A toile is a type of garment we create in order to test the pattern. The toile is often made from inexpensive material that holds the same characteristics of your sample fabric. This stage aims to test the fit, length, proportions and other important aspects of your design. Think of the toile as the perfect prototype to test your design and to gain a complete overview. This stage is very important. If your pattern does not work on a toile, then it is likely it wont work when creating a sample from your desired, more expensive fabric.4. Fitting We fit the toile to a model to ensure sizing, design and proportions are correct.5. Changes are made We pay attention to any specifications or changes that are needing to be made before moving on to create the sample. These initial processes are one of the many ways we test efficiency and accuracy in each garment. The toile process allows the designer to play with their design prior to the finalising stages. If any changes are made during the toile/ fitting process, this is then translated back to the pattern and altered.6. A sample is sewn Once the toile is correct, a sample garment will be sewn out of the desired fabric.7. Sample is fitted Final fitting takes place to correct and finalise any required changes Image: AvanturProcess is repeated for perfection The processes are carried out until the client is happy with their garments, and no further edits are needing to be made.8. Graded into other sizes Where grading is required, our expert pattern makers will grade each pattern. Our highly skilled...

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Sourcing Ethical Materials: Understanding the origin of your fabric

Sourcing Ethical Materials: Understanding the origin of your fabric

Posted by on Mar 8, 2019 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Industry Know How, Lifestyle | 0 comments

 Choosing eco-friendly fabrics can be an imperative factor in determining whether your label can withstand the constant evolution towards a greener industry. But even when making conscious decisions about your material choices, it’s hard to know what the most sustainable choice can be. Here’s our short list of mighty materials leading the way in eco-fashion! CottonWhat is probably the most durable, versatile and widely used textiles, cotton is actually the most damaging to our ecosystems and natural resources! In its production, a substantial amount of dyes and pesticides can be added, plus it can be a hard task in determining the conditions that the cotton has been harvested in. However, organic cotton is a great alternative that can ensure transparency in the harvesting of the material. Read more here on the production of organic cotton.  LyocellHave you heard of lyocell? This nifty fabric might just be the way of the future! Lyocell is an environmentally friendly material made from wood pulp. The fibre can be more expensive than other materials, however is proven to have fantastic results being both 100% biodegradable and uncompromising with quality and comfort. Read more here on the game changing benefits of lyocell here.  (via Simplifi Fabric) HempOne of nature’s wonders, hemp is a material bursting at the seams (pun intended!) with environmental benefits. This crop has the potential to clean up soil pollution and maybe most impressively, only requires half the amount of water to produce into a textile than cotton. Major brand Patagonia says “[it] has a wonderful drape, comparable to linen.”Read more here on the benefits of hemp in fashion and society at large.  BambooBamboo is a fast growing, naturally produced material that has become a popular textile choice in sustainable fashion. The textile is naturally super soft, UV repellent, odorless and antibacterial. The downside to the widespread use of bamboo can arise in the use of chemicals and pesticides when processing the material- i.e – turning Bamboo into a useable material. Viscose rayon is a common form of a bamboo based material, however can often be treated with unnatural solutions at the time of processing. Bamboo Lyocell is even the next best step for the conscious consumer. Read more here on how it is produced. Common forms of textile production (via Green Hub Online/ Chic Vegan) LinenSimilar to cotton or bamboo, Linen is a natural fibre produced via extraction from the stalk of a flax plant. The flax plant is SO versatile! Flax can produce a wide range of products from textiles to linoleum flooring, and even providing the natural health benefits of flaxseed oil. As a textile, linen is extremely durable, hypoallergenic and breathable. Consumers are not compromised for quality, and sources say linen clothing only gets better with each wear!Read more here on the benefits of the flax plant and linen. (via Life Giving Linen) For more information, education and direction, get in contact with...

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Mentee’s Launch: Love Linen

Mentee’s Launch: Love Linen

Posted by on Feb 4, 2019 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Mentee | 0 comments

Our Mentee: Helen Atcheson, owner of Love LinenRecent graduate of Sample Room’s Fashion Label Launch Pad Program, Helen Atcheson has launched an ethically accredited and sustainable womenswear label, Love Linen! Inspired by the Australian climate, in particular the tropics of Broome, Helen’s collection seeks to capture a true quality, luxury and style designed to last a lifetime.What is your collection about? Love Linen is a high quality collection of womenswear born from a passion for sustainable and locally produced clothing. Linen is the ultimate ‘resort wear’ textile, and our goal is to create a luxurious range of consciously manufactured clothing.Who is it for? It’s not just for the everyday woman. She loves quality over quantity, she appreciates classic styles, she does her part for a sustainable future, she shops local… and she loves linen!  What did you do for a career before you started your label? I have a background in hospitality, administration and HR. I also have a strong artistic side, of which I have only just been able to put into practice through launching my own label.What is the biggest thing you learnt whilst working through the development process? I learnt the importance of choosing fabric to suit your design. Fabric, fabric, fabric is the key! I think it is important to realise that you will learn something new at each and every stage of development. You are forever learning and editing your ideas. Learning how to communicate your designs is also extremely important.What would you do differently if you did it all over again? I would have definitely simplified some of my designs for my first launch before moving to more involved patterns. The relationship with your pattern maker is so important! However, I am so happy with my first range and I can only look forward to the growth from here.   How can people buy your product? Love Linen is available online across Australia and New Zealand. We will be participating at local pop-up shops and markets this year in Broome and are working on securing some select wholesale outlets in Broome and around Australia. You can keep up to date with all Love Linen news via our social platforms listed.What is some advice you would give someone else looking to start a label? It will not be easy. If you are not comfortable spending at least $30 – $60K before you make a sale then walk away now. If you still have this niggle that won’t go away of something that is your passion and you know it will work – trust. Trust yourself because you can do it, you just can’t do it alone. You will need help, you will need education and you will need support. At the very least the Launch Pad Program is a fantastic beginning. I wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for a resource such as this out...

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Market Research 101

Market Research 101

Posted by on Jan 9, 2019 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Industry Know How, Marketing, Mentee | 0 comments

When launching a new label into the current landscape of the fashion industry, you can never do too much research! Knowledge is power, and a thorough understanding of where your brand sits alongside your competitors is something that will help in shaping the personality of your brand.Each month our Fashion Label Launch Pad students participate in a hosted group call to discuss queries and questions they are experiencing in the journey of starting up new fashion labels. Last month we discussed what to consider when carrying out market research and how to implement your findings to better your label as a whole. Here are our top considerations!SWOT AnalysisAnalysing your business’ strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats is the first step in helping to determine where your label fits against your competitors in the marketplace you are appealing to, plus the wider fashion marketplace at large.What are your strengths? Is it the team you have behind you? Or is it the technology you have at your fingertips to create your unique garments? What is going to give your business a leg up in this industry and how do you stand out from the crowd?Your weaknesses can be evaluated alongside unexpected threats. Knowing your label’s disadvantages early on will help in staying well prepared for anything that comes your way, therefore being able to problem solve quickly and effectively.Business Plan/ MarketingWhat do you want the next 3-5 years of your business to look like? In the early stages of your label never underestimate the power of goal setting. Set your goals high and don’t stop until you get there!Think of your budget. What costs are going to be involved? How much and how frequently? What about unexpected costs, how are you placed to deal with them?Know your expenses vs your income and use your market research to help in formulating your tailored business plan.Important Considerations and ToolsWhat is the size of the marketplace/ or segment of the marketplace you want to operate in? What are the current trends? Does this segment need another label and how can you position yours to succeed?What is the price point for your product? How does this fit into your desired marketplace?What other labels are selling similar garments at similar price points? You can observe their social activity, marketing and publicity campaigns to help give some direction on how to conduct your own marketing of your label.Useful toolsEcommerce platformsFashion/ trade magazinesPrint and online industry mediaDiscussions with other like minded brands and labels in your marketplaceUse of focus groupsContact Sample Room today to see how we can guide you in formulating your tailored business plan and assist in the success of your new fashion...

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Sustainable Fashion in The Circular Economy

Sustainable Fashion in The Circular Economy

Posted by on Dec 10, 2018 in Emerging Designers, Established Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Industry Know How, Industry Trends, Sample Room Solutions | 0 comments

 In the production of clothing, there is a multitude of stages that can prove highly damaging to our natural resources. Stages of manufacturing that the everyday consumer might be oblivious to. But, the plain and simple red blouse you see sitting on a rack in a store tells a detailed story between its fibres; from its repetitive washing and rinsing to the treatment of harsh chemicals and blending of plastics. Currently, Australians are the second largest consumers of textiles, buying on average almost 27 kilograms of new clothing each year (ABC Radio Melbourne, 2017). Whilst, it is projected that between 2015 and 2050, over 22 million tonnes of microfibre will be dumped into the ocean. (Ellen Macarthur Foundation, 2017).This, alongside today’s rapidly-changing and unpredictable climate, shows being green and making conscious, sustainable choices about the garments we buy and wear has never been more important. However, in order to facilitate change, we need to adapt our chain of consumerism, placing a demand on bettering the standard that our products adhere to. We love fashion and we want to continue wearing and producing beautiful, luxurious clothing, but how do we help in working towards a greener industry? The Circular Economy – what is it?The way in which we consume can be described as linear. We seem to take, create and then dispose. Think of a flower. It is organically produced, growing from the ground, eaten by bugs and animals requiring the nutrients, and then naturally decomposes; ready for the cycle to begin again. Our world is created around a cyclic system, however, in the process of creating man-made products, our natural evolution has inadvertently taken a backseat, sadly leaving our natural resources to suffer. Adapting The Circular Economy would challenge the way in which we use our products and the way mass-companies choose to produce. Here, once a product has reached the end of its lifespan, it would be returned to the manufacturer, recycled and 100% of its materials would go back into creating its newest version.MUD Jeans is a European label that has been implementing such a replenishment cycle since 2013. See how they implement the circular system!Circular Design- In the circular economy, products are designed to be reused easily.  That’s why we don’t use leather labels, but printed ones instead.Produce- We don’t use conventional cotton. Our mills are BCI and GOTS certified.Recycle- Worn out jeans are shredded, cut into pieces and blended with virgin cotton This is how a new denim yarn is born.Lease or Buy- Lease our jeans or just buy them directly online or in one of the stores.Upcycle- Returned jeans are upcycled and sold as unique vintage pairs.Use & Return-  Take them wherever you go, but send them back at the end of use.Is clothing rental the way of the future?                                   Leasing clothing has proven to be a new and innovative business model that keeps...

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