9 Steps To Be Manufacturer Ready

9 Steps To Be Manufacturer Ready

Posted by on Apr 24, 2019 in Emerging Designers, Established Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Industry Know How, Manufacturer | 0 comments

Here at Sample Room, we have a number of meticulous steps in place to ensure the highest quality patterns and samples, ultimately providing you with the best chance to create the perfect garment with your manufacturer. Read on to see the 9 steps we take to ensure you are manufacturer ready and on your way to creating an amazing collection! 1. Design the style When we are creating patterns for our clients there are a variety of ways they communicate their design ideas. Some might come to us with sketches that have been developed by a graphic designer, others with physical examples. Communicating your design ideas can be challenging. In our Fashion Label Launchpad course this is where we start guiding new designers through the process. From here, we flesh out the design as the building block to make the pattern from. 2. A pattern is made Our expert pattern makers use a digital system called CAD. Using a system like this allows us to make patterns quickly and efficiently. Where altering and adjusting of patterns is needed, working from a digital software allows us to make edits much quicker than if the pattern was on card. This ultimately reduces time and money for all our clients. 3. A toile is sewn A toile is a type of garment we create in order to test the pattern. The toile is often made from inexpensive material that holds the same characteristics of your sample fabric. This stage aims to test the fit, length, proportions and other important aspects of your design. Think of the toile as the perfect prototype to test your design and to gain a complete overview. This stage is very important. If your pattern does not work on a toile, then it is likely it wont work when creating a sample from your desired, more expensive fabric. 4. Fitting We fit the toile to a model to ensure sizing, design and proportions are correct. 5. Changes are made We pay attention to any specifications or changes that are needing to be made before moving on to create the sample. These initial processes are one of the many ways we test efficiency and accuracy in each garment. The toile process allows the designer to play with their design prior to the finalising stages. If any changes are made during the toile/ fitting process, this is then translated back to the pattern and altered. 6. A sample is sewn Once the toile is correct, a sample garment will be sewn out of the desired fabric. 7. Sample is fitted Final fitting takes place to correct and finalise any required changes Image: Avantur Process is repeated for perfection The processes are carried out until the client is happy with their garments, and no further edits are needing to be made. 8. Graded into other sizes Where grading is required, our...

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Are you a successful business that has lost faith in your pattern library?

Are you a successful business that has lost faith in your pattern library?

Posted by on Jul 3, 2015 in Established Designers, Industry Know How | 0 comments

You are not alone. I often talk on this blog about issues that start-ups encounter. Mainly because they are many and varied and a new issue arises each week. Today I would like to talk to you about another key group of customers that often call us in absolute panic and with an urgent, very problem. Quite often this customer has been in business for 5-10 yrs. They have built a business on a great idea, sales have grown at a steady rate but they have now reached a sustainable level which is great but this now exposes some major pattern making issues that have compounded from cheap start-up costs and a culmination of different pattern makers, specification sheets and off shore patterns. Customers have started complaining and sales are lost sending the business backwards quickly. Whilst the above paragraph seems scary to many of us, it is nothing in comparison to the huge collection of patterns that need changing and the unknown costs to do so. How much will this cost to correct ALL these patterns? Where do you start? Is this going to break your business more than a few unhappy customers? Well it does not have to be as big a job as it may seem, in fact it is a chance to take on a new level of professionalism and gain a whole new customer base. On the plus side, you know how to sell, you have a name people know, and if you have caught it early the damage will not be too great. I love working with these customers but it is clear to me there is a smart way of going about it and an expensive way of going about it. There may be some pattern makers who start at pattern 1 and move through the range 1 pattern at a time racking up a huge bill at the end. At Sample Room we take a more holistic approach. We meet for an in-depth consultation where we overview the whole range, talk about what is working and the company goals. So often what is discovered is through the growth of the company the owner admits that there have been some decisions made that now don’t make a lot of sense. Once we have overviewed the whole situation it is possible that you have 4 core styles and once these styles are corrected and approved you can develop 16 styles off these in line with your current patterns. With computer pattern making it is easy. You will have a clearer approach and much smaller bill than expected. So if you have found your business in this predicament and you would like to know more, give us a call on 03 9041 3488 to arrange a consultation. We also conduct meetings on skype so if you are interstate or overseas you can still talk...

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Pre-production samples- your last line of defence!

Posted by on Jun 10, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Why sample? Hi all! We thought we’d make the subject of today’s post, the pre-production sample. That’s a sample made after you’ve got your fabrics and trims, just before you go to production. We work together with you and your choice of manufacturer to get a garment that will work perfectly on the production line. Some designers think that making a pre-production sample is a waste of time, and a spec sheet should be enough. But to us this sample is the key to a great result – and a safeguard against disaster. Here’s why. Fabrics change. When you order sampling lengths of fabric from your fabric supplier, they come off a small run of development fabrics. Once bulk is ordered it is added to a large quantity of other orders and then thousands of meters are produced. There is no guarantee that the bulk fabric is produced in the same way as the sampling. It could be wound tighter, which would result in more shrinkage than the sampling fabric. Or it may stretch more. Colours may be different, as dye lots are notoriously difficult to match exactly. More than one designer has been horrified to find that the fabric they’ve bought looks or reacts so differently that the garment no longer works. Sample again, be sure, make changes, and you won’t be lumped with a full run of unsellable garments. Trims change The trims used on your first sample will almost definitely be different to the trims used in production. The elastic may have been bought locally, whereas you production elastic was bought bulk. The stretch and return of this elastic may be different. You will need to see if they react and give you the same result at the end. All machinists sew in a different way We have seen as many versions of a welt pocket as we have known machinists. All achieve the same result, but it depends on the method they learnt at the factory they worked at. Some like welt pockets sewn as one piece for 2 welts, some like 2 x 7cm pieces, some like 2x narrow pieces to fit exactly. No one is incorrect. Machinists require different indications Some machinists like .5 clearance from the end of the drill hole, some like .7cm. It is at the pre-production stage that the factory sample machinist is able to work this out and change the pattern accordingly. Sure, you could tell them to just suck it up and do it your way – but wouldn’t you be happier knowing that the machinist was doing her best work? Making a pre-production sample makes sense – it’s your final bit of insurance. Make one every time you order fabric for a new run. If you have any questions or would like to know more about the process from design to production, please let us know...

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