The Initial Design Meeting

Posted by on Oct 27, 2017 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Industry Know How, Manufacturer, Mentee, Sample Room Solutions | 0 comments

When you first start your label it is a really exciting time. You have every right to feel proud and eager. But, you may also feel apprehension too. This is normal. You will have a lot of questions; this is normal too.One of the most common questions we hear from start-ups is ‘What do I bring to my design meeting?’ and ‘How do I explain what I want?’ Well, at Sample Room, we can help answer these questions no matter who you work with, as well as alleviate any concerns you may have.The initial design meeting is the most important stage in development. It is not something to be rushed and there is a certain process that is needed to get all your ideas out of your head and mouth in a way that explains it to a pattern maker to create your vision. It is your chance to unload everything to us.Your worries, your ideas, everything. This meeting is about anything you choose; it’s all about you, your designs and dreams, your budget, and your questions. It’s a good idea in the weeks and days leading up to the meeting to jot down some of the issues you’d like to go over. Write down all your questions, note the choices of fabrics that you’re thinking of using for your garments, bring in garments to show fit, make or fabric, bring in swatches, and tear out pics from magazines. You can use this meeting to simply have a chat with us; to bring forth the ideas that are presently buried within. We understand that ideas have to germinate in your brain; equally, we understand that an idea will stay as just that until you talk it over with someone.The best advice we can give you, however, in preparing for the design meeting, is to make sure you know your customer. This is so important, we can’t stress it enough. You need to have researched every aspect about your customer, you need to have invested time and energy into them. If you’re about to launch a label, you have to know that person is out there to buy it. It’s no use creating cycle wear for women who wear Size 16 and over if you’ve not done the research to show that such a product will sell. Likewise, if you are designing quality work-wear for the professional woman, make sure you understand everything about her. What is her age bracket? What is her salary range? Is she a working mum, or is she child-free? What movies does she like to watch? What are her hobbies?Does she do yoga, or is she a marathon runner? Know the other brands that your customer purchases. Have a clear picture in mind, so that you are well-placed to succeed in launching. Reach out to your customer, get their feedback, and make conversations and connections.Why...

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Mentee’s Launch: GOLDI

Mentee’s Launch: GOLDI

Posted by on May 31, 2017 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Industry Know How, Lifestyle, Mentee | 1 comment

 The essence of GOLDI comes from the deep held philosophy of the founder, Helena Golden, that all people have a right to health and equality. To support this ethos, GOLDI will contribute 10% of all profits earned from the sale of GOLDI garments to the education of under privileged children.  The dream: To contribute to others who may not have had the chance otherwise, to live their best life possible. GOLDI is starting its journey with a focus on fashion athleisure for strong females and role models for young girls globally.1. What is your label and who is it for? My label is GOLDI. An athleisure brand that is both functional and chic with a monochrome aesthetic. The designs, while have a stripped back simplicity, have striking details that will set the GOLDI woman apart. Designed for the urban woman between 18-35 who is is a strong individual, comfortable in her own skin, who leads a busy life and often wears active/athleisure wear styled up or down to suit many different daily occasions.2. How long ago did you start the process of your own label?I started just under a year ago.3. What is the biggest thing you have learnt through the process?  When you start the process of developing your own brand and you haven’t come from a fashion, design and development background within the Australian fashion industry landscape, you really don’t know what you don’t know.  Initially I wasted the first two months learning from my mistakes rather than learning from established experts in the industry.  I would strongly encourage anyone who is thinking about starting their own fashion brand to engage with the Council of Textile and Fashion and take the Sample Room’s Fashion Label Launchpad course.  It will cut through a lot of noise and accelerate your development process.  It will also make you more credible when dealing with manufacturers because you learn very quickly how to speak their language and you have an appreciation for their process steps.4. What is one thing you would tell another designer before they were starting out? Firstly, I would say if you have a burning desire to produce your own fashion label, do it.  Educate yourself so that you’re equipped to do it as well as you possibly can and don’t be afraid to acknowledge that there will be many days when you doubt yourself but never lose sight of your dream.  Dreams are worth fighting for!5. What was your next biggest hurdle?  While I’ve already been working on this for nearly a year I would say I’m only now at the starting blocks.  It’s all about marketing, PR and customer experience from here.  I need to build GOLDI brand exposure with the right messaging so the unique reasons to wear GOLDI are understood and bought into by my target customer.  Once the GOLDI message is out there and customers buy into GOLDI, I want them to have a great experience, love the...

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Transform your IKEA Kura with the Safe Night Net

Transform your IKEA Kura with the Safe Night Net

Posted by on May 10, 2017 in Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Mentee | 0 comments

 So often people have an idea for a ‘Thing’… this ‘Thing’ is made from fabric but it is not ‘Fashion’ or even Clothing. In today’s blog you will find out about one of our clients, Megan, and her journey to create a bed cover using an IKEA bed. The Safe Night Net looks like a normal mosquito net, but it’s not. It’s designed to keep some things out and others in. The mesh used is 100% made in the USA — used for industrial applications. It looks and feels good, but can also survive all kinds of mistreatment without developing tears or holes. See just how strong it is in this video when put to the test against normal mosquito netting.This specialty product is made by a small family business operating out of Australia, and they are dedicated to producing a quality product for Safe Night Net (plus they will back it up with a 12-month guarantee against tears and holes). We asked Megan some important questions on how she started the process of creating the world’s strongest mosquito net1. What is your label and who is it for?My brand is the Safe Night Net. It is a very strong net that fully encloses an IKEA bed. It is for parents of children aged 3 and up. It’s a mosquito net, but it can work for children with a variety of issues, including sensory processing disorders.2. How long ago did you start the process of your own label?Over two years ago. It’s been a much slower process than I expected. A big part of this was waiting on shipments of materials from overseas. And finding a Patternmaker!3. What is the biggest thing you have learnt through the process?That other people’s input is VITAL.If it wasn’t for other people’s expertise (including Julia’s), I would never have got this far. I’m not really a collaborator by nature – being a bit of a know-it-all and an introvert – and I’ve got away with it on previous projects where I have a lot of expertise, but NOT THIS TIME. Trying to enter a new industry is a massively challenging and complex undertaking. You need a guide.Also, discussing your project with others – even if they aren’t experts – can throw up very useful ideas. Here’s a recent example: I was telling a close friend I had booked the first photo shoot for my product. She asked how I was styling the product. I said “I’m not styling it – it’s a practical product, not really a décor thing”. My friend was horrified and said I was missing a big opportunity to market my product on social media with cute photos. She was totally right. If I hadn’t (manically) gathered together some quilts, cushions, etc, – and ordered some adorable stickers for the bed – my photos would have looked super dull and medical. Looking back on it, I...

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