Q & A With Mentee Joseph Carl

Posted by on Sep 10, 2018 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Mentee, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Joseph Carl Streetwear by our mentee, Joseph CarlWe love seeing our mentees journey throughout the Launch Pad program. A lot of hard work goes into every stage of design, construction and production and it is wonderful to see their collections in their final form. Below we have a Q & A from our past mentee, Joseph Carl, we discuss the challenges, successes and the big question – Would he do it all over again???  Visit Joseph Carl. What is your range about?Joseph Carl is a high-end streetwear brand with it’s main goal of merging luxury elements with streetwear. We are inspired by trends and era’s mixing old and new, street culture, music and sporting lifestyles. Our first collection “Chapter One: The Introduction” is an introduction of the brand to the people. It is a set of limited edition high-end streetwear basics that can be worn all together or separately and be styled formally or casually.Who is it for?It is a menswear brand but the brand is suited for anyone (male or female) who have an appreciation for street culture and luxury.What did you do for a career before you started your label?Before I started Joseph Carl, I was studying a university degree and graduated with a Bachelor of Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations, while working part-time for a media company.What is the biggest thing you learnt whilst working through the development process.There have been so many things I have learnt while starting this label. It’s been a massive learning experience. Stepping into this industry with no fashion related experience the whole development process has been a massive eye opener. I didn’t realise how much it took to create a single garment. Fabric knowledge, Sampling stages and garment construction, and dealing with people in business and the fashion industry are the biggest areas in which I’ve learnt the most.What would you do differently if you did it all over again?Time management is something that I would work on in the future. focusing your time (hours/days) on certain sections of the brand/business to really be able to excel in all areas. If this is achieved in future collections, it will be a smoother ride.How can people buy your product?People are able to purchase items through our online store at: www.josephcarl.comWhat is some advice you would give someone else looking to start a label?My advice to anyone starting is to do your research. Know exactly who you want to target and what short and long term goals you want to achieve. Once you have this you have drive to achieve the things you want.Another piece of advice is to be able to think on your feet, not everything is going to go to plan. Be able to think quickly and have a solution to problems that you didn’t think you would...

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Mentee’s Launch: Sleep With Me

Posted by on Apr 16, 2018 in Emerging Designers, Follow the Label, Mentee | 0 comments

Our Mentee: Sammie Russell, Owner of Sleep With MeToday, we would love to introduce you to our latest mentee to launch, Sammie Russell from Sleep With Me.Sammie’s journey of launching her range combined her love of prints, her understanding of social media and her new found knowledge of the development and manufacturing process. Always a pleasure to work with, her friendliness and enthusiasm for learning makes Sammie one of our favourite customers. I hope you enjoy learning about how she developed her range.What is your range about?Sleep With Me is a luxury sleepwear label. Each piece is sourced carefully utilising luxurious fabrics, while also partnering with considered detail. Our one of a kind designs are hand drawn and digitally printed making them truly special.Who is it for?Our customer appreciates high-quality fabric, ethical manufacturing and attention to detail through our packaging.What did you do for a career before you started your label?I jumped into the design world straight out of high school with no industry experience. I built the brand from a dream and a strong work ethic.Never lose your passion and don't be afraid to ask for help. Click To TweetWhat is the biggest thing you learnt whilst working through the development process?I think the biggest lesson for me is that you don’t know what you don’t know and the best thing to do is to surround yourself with industry professionals and mentors that can guide you. It can be incredibly overwhelming and things often don’t go to plan but if you have support around you and are not afraid to ask for advice, it can make a huge difference.The development process can be incredibly stressful as things don’t often go to plan.What would you do differently if you did it all over again?If I did it all over again I would hope that I would allow myself more time to work through problems that arise and I would definitely reach out for help rather than trying to resolve everything myself.How can people buy your product?You can buy our products via our website www.sleepwithme.com.au and we are currently working on stocking to other e-commerce sites which is very exciting.What is some advice you would give someone else looking to start a label?I would say that it is not easy by any means but hard work often outweigh talent so if you are willing to put in the work, you will reap the rewards of a successful business. Never lose your passion and don’t be afraid to ask for help.If you would like to learn how to develop and launch your own range. Join our Fashion Label Launchpad, as Sammie did, and learn all there is to know to be a fashion designer.Follow Sleep With MeWebsite: www.sleepwithme.com.au Instagram: @sleepwithme Facebook: Sleep With...

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Mentee’s Launch: Harry & Pop

Posted by on Jan 12, 2018 in Follow the Label, Mentee | 2 comments

Today, we would like to introduce one of our favourite mentees from Harry & Pop — Lauren. We first met Lauren a number of months earlier before, as she will mention on the blog, she went down another path which was not so successful. We were more than happy when she called us back as we knew we could get her label and her dreams back on track. Lauren has been such a pleasure to work with because she understands the difference it makes with quality pattern making, sample making and manufacturing and how it feels when you are fully supported in your journey. Lauren and Ben’s Kid 1. What is your label and who is it for? Proudly made in Melbourne, Harry & Pop has designed a range of contemporary children’s swimwear (sizes 00-4) that puts sun protection first without compromising on style. Our premium Italian fabric is UPF 50+ and chlorine resistant to ensure your little rays of sunshine look stylish while staying protected from the sun’s harmful rays. With classic unisex designs in simple custom prints across a crisp pastel colour palette, you can be confident that your child will grow out of our swimwear before it wears out so please hand it down to every member of your tribe.The idea came to me when I purchased my son’s first swimsuit (late 2015). I found myself becoming increasingly frustrated by the lack of sun protective options that were also stylish.Click To Tweet2. How long ago did you start the process of your own label? The idea came to me when I purchased my son’s first swimsuit (late 2015). I found myself becoming increasingly frustrated by the lack of sun protective options that were also stylish (everything was fluoro or covered in ugly motifs). We started seriously considering the idea in late 2016 and launched our first collection one year later in mid-October 2017.3. What is the biggest thing you have learnt through the process? The fashion industry is fickle. It’s very hard to get a straight answer when starting out. Everyone is vague and to be honest, I’m pretty sure it’s because no one wants to take on a start-up label. That’s where Sample Room saved the day! Finally, some transparency! Before finding Sample Room we found that no one would commit to a deadline. Days (sometimes weeks) would pass before we heard back. Costing estimates simply weren’t given which makes budgeting impossible. Be wary of this and expect to be in limbo for a while.4. What is one thing you would tell another designer before they were starting out? Make sure you keep some money in the bank for marketing once you’ve launched. Honestly, nothing comes for free so don’t rely on the kindness of strangers to help out (Instagram shout-outs, magazine editorial etc.). They will charge you! And that’s okay too as they’re also trying to make...

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Seasonality in Design

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Industry Know How, Sample Room Solutions | 0 comments

Are you someone who’s ready to jump into the fashion industry? Are you an aspiring creative? Maybe you have a business that is linked to the industry, or you create gorgeous designs. You know you’ve got style, the eye for detail and the ambition that is needed to drive success. But there’s still so much within the industry that eludes you. Maybe you are already in the design stage and ready to choose the gorgeous fabrics that you’ve imagined for your designs. Maybe you don’t know how to approach a fabric supplier.There is a bit more to seeing a fabric supplier than you might imagine. Let me explain. A fabric agent is a trendsetter the same as a designer is. They are ‘designing’ their range in the same way a top design house does. They look to future trends in colour pallets and fabrication from the leading authorities and design the range of base fabrics and colours so that when you, the designer, come to see them they have what you have been inspired by. They understand what fabrics they need to have on hand so that you can design the look you are after.There are also 2 major different ranges they hold. One is stock fabric and one is seasonal. Did you know about the seasonal aspect behind fabric selection? If you are looking for the latest in fabrics and colours you will be looking for seasonal stock. This stock is limited and will not repeat so the fabric agent can bring the latest and greatest to their range each season. You will need to be quick from initial sampling to purchasing bulk as this fabric sells out and does not repeat. You can put a hold on the amount of fabric you need, but only for a short time. I can tell that some of you might be nodding your head because you have experienced this, but believe me when I tell you that there are plenty of people out there who aren’t aware. I feel that seasonal fabric buying is best left to the experts who understand the pace of the fashion industry and their customer requirements.There is also forecasting of fabrics. For example, when Melbourne is in the heart of winter and you look out the window of the tram in the city, you see the teeming rain and bleak greyness. You also glimpse people moving around – under umbrellas or running for cover – dressed in the chic style of winter: scarves, boots, hats and coats. Understand that designers are way past that season. The colours you are looking at today were selected a year ago and have come and gone from the fabric agents. Designers are beginning to sell summer stock to buyers and retailers for a full year ahead and they are delivering summer stock into retail stores that they first saw...

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Customisation versus Bespoke

Customisation versus Bespoke

Posted by on Aug 9, 2017 in Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Industry Know How, Industry Trends, Lifestyle, Sample Room Solutions | 2 comments

The fashion industry is always moving. It’s the ethos behind it, really. Fashion moves us, shakes us, tempts us and encourages us to try something new.The latest disrupter to our world in fashion is known as customisation.It’s happening all over the fashion world: with handbags, shoes and clothing! It is also happening with consumer goods as well—do you remember Coca-Cola selling bottles with your name on it, as did Nutella? That’s all part of customisation.There are a number of factors behind the increase in customisation. Creating a point of difference in a tough retail market can give your brand exposure and create a successful profitable business. One highly positive way to view customisation is the pinnacle of customer service. It makes your customer feel special. You are able to give them something that no one else can.It’s exciting and interesting. But also very tricky for a start-up. Customisation can be quite cost-prohibitive for a start-up. Perhaps if you are lucky to have partners or investors, you can dabble in this latest trend, but generally speaking, it makes for headaches for you, the designer, and your manufacturer. It is important to understand the difference between Customisation, Made to order and Bespoke (or made to measure).Customisation is the first level of making something individual. It is where the customer gets to personalise their product. If you’re designing a T-shirt, your customer, through customisation, can request to have a short sleeve T-shirt, instead of the long-sleeve tee you’ve designed. Or, request for their own initials to be placed on the front pocket or a split where a seam would normally go. Of course, you want to give your customer enough choice in details to make it individual while keeping within the parameters of what is capable. What do I mean by this? To understand the parameters it is important to understand the basic economics of mass production (by mass I mean more than one garment).The price of these products is determined by the cost of making the product (fabrics, trims and make costs) plus margin, plus mark up to wholesale and then the retail mark up.In order to keep within a reasonable price-point, you must keep the initial cost of fabric and production as low as possible. The way to do this is through bulk production. We start this process by creating a production marker (laying the pattern pieces on the fabric in the most cost effective way. This allows for greater than 75% usage of the fabric which is very high) you then lay fabric on top of each other in multiple lays, sometimes 100 lays, to reduce the time to cut each garment (this is called bulk cutting). Garments are then sewn in a production line of a few machinists all working on their individual machines at the same time to utilise machinery and time. Economies of scale reduce the...

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What is a Toile?

What is a Toile?

Posted by on Aug 3, 2017 in Emerging Designers, Fashion, Fashion Design, Follow the Label, Industry Know How, Industry Trends, Lifestyle, Sample Room Solutions | 0 comments

Photo: Actual Toile Fitting in Sample RoomThere are many tricks of the trade within any industry. Certainly, within the fashion industry, one such trick is a toile. But what is it, exactly?A toile is a word, derived from the French language, which describes a mock-up of your design. It is an early version of a garment, made of a cheaper, but similar fabric, to test and perfect the design. You can see how important this is to the industry, and also you, as the designer. It is in this toile that a designer can see if the garment is going to sing or sink. It is a necessary step and will assist in avoiding wasting money on sampling that will otherwise fail. I like to call it a quick and dirty version of your design.When it comes to a toile, it is essential to use a fabric that is similar to the one you will use for your garments. If your design is made from a heavy and stiff fabric, then find something cheap and similar to this. If you’re going for a drapey, slinky and lightweight feel, then yes, do the same: find something close to this, but much cheaper and use for your toile.In addition to being a similar weight and feel to your actual fabric, the fabric for a toile should be light in colour, so that you can use tailor’s chalk to mark out where changes need to be made. Here is where you get to test the design lines, and the fit of the garment. You can make markings on the toile and see if a lower V neckline will suit better than the round neck that you initially sketched. The toile will guide you to add darts, or lengthen the hemline, or if cap sleeves will fit better than a three-quarter sleeve.The toile is your important chance to play with your design.Once you’ve made the changes to the toile, then translate them back to your pattern. If you’ve had to cinch in areas on the toile where there was too much fabric, or if you’ve had to loosen where the toile showed pulling and stretching, translate these into your pattern. You might even choose to make a second toile if you’ve made a lot of changes.We prefer to start with a toile. There is nothing worse than making a garment up with topstitching, pockets, overlocking and lining only to find out the shape is not right. It really is a waste of money. A toile costs approx half the cost of a sample if not less. Therefore this is valuable money wasted. I much prefer that we get the shape, length and placement of key measurements right first before creating the final garment.Another option is the make the toile in the final sample fabric but only make it to a toile standard. We call this a...

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